Mitglied des Monats

Seit März 2018 veröffentlicht das IBC auf seiner Website jeden Monat einen Kalender, der eine Mitgliedsorganisation präsentiert - das so genannte Mitglied des Monats. Die Mitglieder des Netzwerkkomitees werden sich in den nächsten zwei Jahren mit allen Mitgliedsorganisationen in Verbindung setzen, um die notwendigen Informationen zu sammeln. Die Mitgliedsorganisationen werden in Englisch und Französisch vorgestellt. Wir wünschen viel Spaß dabei, jeden Monat ein Mitglied des IBC zu entdecken!

Finnland

Juni 2019

Q&A with Pekka Lund, Executive Manager of Finish Blue Ribbon

Pekka LundExecutive Manager at Finish Blue Ribbon

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

The Blue Cross is a source of hope, mercy and justice and I find it utmost important to be part of that work. As the polarization of our society seems to be growing we as the Blue Cross need both to bring hope to marginalized individuals and critical but constructive voices to societal discussions.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work – if so, which aspects?

I am convinced that the organization I am honoured to lead and our more than one hundred member organizations around the country are doing every day miracles in the lives of many – providing housing, food, life skills, communities, peer groups etc. If I may somehow positively contribute to that work, yes, I am convinced of the impact.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Of course, there is much to rejoice but to point to an exact moment: I had an encounter with a volunteer worker in one of our member organizations; he told about his everyday habit of helping hungry people. His passion, faith, and desire to help still makes me cry when I recall the small discussion we had. That is the strength of our movement.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

We are living in uncertainty about the future of the role of NGO's and FBO's in our social security systems: how are housing units, day centres etc. financed in the future and what kind of a competition between enterprises and NGO's there possibly is waiting - this all remains obscure at the moment. Therefore we, as an umbrella organization, share this uncertainty of our member organizations.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

We are running several great projects and it is impossible to choose one over the other. Therefore, I pick the latest, a project we have just started, one, where we develop and provide first aid for family, both parents and siblings, and if needed, grandparents as well, where a child has started using drugs: we provide, for instance, information, individual and group counselling, and family camps.

Chile

Mai 2019

Q&A with Fernando Ivan Alvarado ,President of Communidad La Roca

Fernando Ivan AlvaradoPresident of Chile - La Roca

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

The BC provides a permanent strategies’ actualisation, strengthen the collaboration and gives spaces for personal strengthening, capacitation and training.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work – if so, which aspects?

Yes, life restoration: In average 100 persons a year fulfil their rehab programs and take back their live, family and work.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Having the opportunity to share in the meetings with programmes that help the communities in other places with the purpose to serve others, knowing their way to work and to enrich our daily work.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

Been able to go and to give something meaningful in every BC activity.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

Cruz Azul La Roca Viña del Mar, it is the oldest and the most recognized by the authorities.

Frankreich

April 2019

Q&A with Guilaine Miranda, National President of SFCB

Guilaine MirandaNational President of SFCB

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

The notions of mutual aid, support, sharing and solidarity with others are the core values of the SFCB. Committed since 2000, I did not only get out of alcohol thanks to the SFCB in my region, I also put in everything to become the National President of this wonderful association in 2016 because I share its values. The SFCB forges close links with the medical and social world to promote its actions and support the patients and their families. I like this dynamism that the commitment implies.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work – if so, which aspects?

The work which is done within the SFCB is a team work. On-site, we have many volunteer activists working without counting their time or energy…
At the level of the Board of Directors, the management team, we work on the evolution of the SFCB and then propose our guidelines to the General Assembly. The latest guidelines aimed at opening up to addictions other than alcohol. We also worked on risk reduction to match the medical world that rejects abstinence in favour of moderation. These guidelines required significant information and training work for our members.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

At the SFCB, we are all volunteers. Our reward is therefore not financial at all. On the other hand, to hear a whole room, composed of our members from all over France and even abroad, singing a Blue Cross song in chorus during a National Congress is a very strong and moving reward.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The biggest challenge has been to forge links with the medical world which did nor know us and above all did not recognize us as competent in helping sick people. Another challenge has been to join forces with other associations similar to ours to become stronger, more visible and audible within a single coordination, the Camerup.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

At more than 135 years of age, our good old SFCB needs a renewal of youth, both in our internal image as well as in the external view. We are currently working on a new logo project and a more modern, positive and liberating signature or slogan. We must change the feeling and representation of shame and frustration of abstinent people, who must be able to live their lives as a well-considered choice for fulfillment and inner peace.

Deutschland

Februar 2019

Q&A with Benjamin Becker, Head of blu:prevent

Benjamin BeckerHead of blu:prevent

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

The mixture of volunteers and full-time employees in all age groups, paired with our multi-faceted topics and target groups makes the Blue Cross in Germany really exciting. It ist truly impressive to see how many people contribute with heart and passion to accompany others out of addiction.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work – if so, which aspects?

The many self-help groups in Germany, for example, take on responsibilities that the German inpatient / professional health care system could not otherwise afford. The holistic and sustainable support of addicted people over the long term is a unique service; and for many people, it is crucial to their well-being. In the area of prevention, we have gained deep experience.  In 2018 our content reached 1.2 million people via social media. This should be topped in 2019! The new chat on our app is innovative; it is a consulting model for the future.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Two moments come to mind immediately. What makes me really happy, is to see how our volunteer self-help workers (many of whom are at an advanced age) are building their own regional projects using the digital modules. I am also happy and proud to have received an award from the Drug Commissioner of the German Federal Government in 2018.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The biggest challenge for me is the age-demographic in the Blue Cross. The majority of self-help members are getting older and have difficulty embracing the digital technologies required to reach target audiences in 2019. If we coud overcome that barrier, we would be able to develop the potential and the power of the Blue Cross in Germany. We really need to keep developing new technology skills in order to be fit for the future.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

Three projects are tremendously exciting in the Blue Cross in Germany. One is called "Addiction self-help goes new ways" which is renewing the range of self-help suppport services, driven by innovative ideas. The "blu: prevent" addiction prevention project targeted at young people is notable for the strong response it has generated. It has its own website, online modules and app.  The third project is our social media activities.

Togo

Dezember 2018

Q&A avec AYAOVI MOTCHON, COORDINATEUR DU PROJET

AYAOVI MOTCHONAYAOVI MOTCHON

1. Pourquoi le travail de la Croix-Bleue est-il important pour toi?

Le travail de la Croix Bleue est d’une importance capitale pour moi parce qu’il s’agit de sauver des vies humaines.

2. As-tu pu observer des changements apportés par ton travail? si oui, lesquels?

Assurément oui. Beaucoup de vies ont changé par notre travail. Des milliers de gens prennent conscience des méfaits et risques liés aux fléaux contre lesquels nous luttons. De surcroit, la Croix Bleue du Togo commence par acquérir une certaine visibilité aussi bien sur le plan national qu’international.

3. Quels furent les moments les plus heureux dans ton travail à la Croix-Bleue?

Le jour le plus heureux pour moi au cours de mon travail pour la Croix Bleue fut celui où une dame est venue me remercier et me dire que par ma collaboration avec son mari, ce dernier a cessé de prendre de l’alcool et que son foyer vit à présent dans l’harmonie.

4. Quel fut, ou est, le plus gros défi à relever dans le travail de la Croix-Bleue?

Ce qui a longtemps manqué et qui demeure le plus grand défi pour le travail de la Croix Bleue au Togo, ce sont les ressources financières. Nous avons une vision claire et ambitieuse de notre tâche et des ressources humaines compétentes, mais les bailleurs font défaut. Bien que notre association ait été créée en 1991, le premier financement externe n’est venu qu’en juillet 2018.

5. Quel est, à ton avis, le projet Croix-Bleue le plus important dans ton pays?

La construction d’un centre de référence en matière de recherche et de prise en charge des victimes de l’alcool, du tabac et autres substances psychoactives est d’une importance capitale.

Ungarn

Januar 2019

Q&A with Nemeth Katalin Balogh, President of BC Hongarie

Nemeth Katalin BaloghPresident of BC Hongarie

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

From God our mission is to proclaim the salvation of Jesus Christ toward people suffering from alcoholism.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work – if so, which aspects?

In Hungary, the healing service is recognized nationwide. Healthcare, social and church workers send us the helpers.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Finding a community of faith during the service.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

Among the common changes, find the way and conditions for further operation.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

Now and the next year we build a healing home. This construction will help to improve the conditions of our service. So we can pay more attention to our alcoholic brothers.

Polen

November 2018

Q&A with Ewa Duda, Addiction Therapist and Conference Coordinator

Eva DudaAddiction Therapist and Conference Coordinator

1. Why is the work of the Blue Cross important to you?

The mission statement of our Polish branch is to help people in life crisis situations according to the Christian worldview; substance or behavioural addiction and related problems are such crisis situations. One does not need to be a professional to notice that there is a growing number of people with mental problems. Some of them are addictions, and in this sphere we are observing a rise in the number of people escaping through work, gambling, excessive exercise, sexual behaviours, spending time in virtual reality. People are simply looking for something to help them feel better. But it actually enslaves them, and God’s plan for His beloved creation – human beings – is the opposite. Being close to the broken hearted and helping them to change their lives is something very precious to me.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes, I am! I am not reinventing a wheel, but we often forget how important it is to listen. Just to be there, ready to hear the story of somebody’s pain sometimes ask an eye-opening question, sometimes to comfort, and sometimes to motivate the person to keep up their work. I feel privileged to be a companion in a person’s journey to  new life. One of the most inspiring moments is seeing the progress in thinking, acting and living of the people I work with.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

A few weeks ago we were discussing the topic of happiness and its meaning with the residents of our rehab centre. The conclusion was that it is not happiness that is important, but rather the state of being content.  So it is hard to just name one moment and call it the happiest – but there are many occasions when I feel blessed to be doing what I do. Some of them are related to the successes of our clients; to see their lives changing, sobering and thriving is a great reward. But I also enjoy working among self-aware and well-trained professionals who are passionate about their work, and are simply great people! The opportunity to improve my skills and develop personally is no less important. All in all, I feel content working for BC and that’s what matters to me.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The biggest challenge – and a big advantage, at the same time – is the variety of work possible within BC. On one hand it is something I do enjoy and it gives me a lot of satisfaction. On the other hand, it is sometimes difficult to synchronise everything. And sometimes it is simply fair to admit, “well, not this time – we have to let this new opportunity go, otherwise, we’ll not be able to make it.” I find such decisions very hard to make.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider your most important project?

As BC Poland we have been involved in the work within substance dependence and related problems. In 2012, we officially started a cooperation with the Fund for Solving Gambling Problems. Since then, this area of work has been constantly growing. Also because behavioural addictions are on the rise, so more and more people need help. Young, digital generations will bring us even more clients. This is why I think we have to reach out to the schools – students, parents and teachers need to know what can bring them probelms and to prevent them. To be honest, I think all of the projects are equally important because they provide integrated and holistic support. We may see a problem in one place, but its root is somewhere else.

Österreich

Oktober 2018

Q&A with Gerhard Wildbichler, Member of the Board, Secretary; Group Leader & Head of counseling center Graz, Steiermark

Gerhard Wildbichler

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

As somebody with first-hand experience of alcohol addiction, I first came across the Blue Cross during in- patient therapy and from then on I was a regular visitor to the Graz information centre. As is probably the case with most chronic illnesses, which require lifelong after-care, the work of the Blue Cross as well as my own work for them is indispensable in order to live a happy and abstinent life.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

My work for the Blue Cross has opened and continues to open doors to many social environmnents  and areas in the health care system. In my area I am gratetful to have the chance to change people’s attitude to addiction and thanks to God’s grace and professional support which allows me to led an abstinent life and in turn do the same for others.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Through my many years of working with the Blue Cross, I have been able to show those suffering from addiction and their familes that asking for and accepting help is not a sign of weakness but of strength. I cannot pinpoint one specific moment of satisfaction but I feel deeply moved  when I can accompany people, whose lives are marked by suffering and misfortune, some  of the way and share their happiness.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

Basically each task related to our activities and those of the information centre presents a new challenge. Just as each person is different so are their worries and fears and this calls for a high level of consideration for each other. My biggest challenge is crisis intervention and how to deal with suicide threats or visits to prisons, clinics and similar  institutions where sufferers and their relatives both need support.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

As a member of the Board of the Austrian BC I have the opportunity to participate directly and indirectly in developing projects. As a speaker in our addiction advisor seminars, professional training and life long learning for our employees is a priority as well as the sharing of professional resources through seminars, workshops, round tables and similar events in schools, companies, associations and other interest groups.

Brasilien

September 2018

Q&A with Alana Sieves Wendenhausen, Coordinator of Prevention Area

Alana Sieves Wendenhausen

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

Because it does not let me stagnate either as a professional or as a person. It is so exciting, that I want to continuously pursue new knowledge to improve my  work. In the Blue Cross, I have both professional freedom and I work as part of a team – part of a family. Each child or adolescent that I meet shows me how I can be a better person and this motivates me!

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes. The growing number of approaches used for prevention by the Blue Cross in Brazil over the few last years that bring innovative proposals and the constant evaluation — or the search for methods already evaluated and proven by their efficacy —as well as the feedback we receive from the public we have assisted.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

Do I have to choose just one? There are several! All of the projects have a certain moment — I can’t spot exactly when, but usually in the last phases — when you start observing that more than the objective has been concluded in each child or adolescent. I start thinking about what they were like when I met them and how they behave today. They are fun without being silly; they were totally immature regarding many things, but now they know how to have a position or opinion, how to make a difference. This is really beautiful in my eyes.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The beginning of my work in prevention was a challenge as a whole. Everything was quite new for me because up to that time I used to work on the treatment of the chemical dependence. Currently, the biggest challenge is the scientific evidence of the efficacy of our work; this is one of my main objectives in the work of prevention of the Blue Cross in Brazil.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

The set of services rendered by the projects. There is no project that is more important than another: all of them are part of a process of bringing LIFE to the people.

Madagaskar

August 2018

Q&A with Rasolomanana Holiarisoa Fanjanirina, National Coordinator

Rasolomanana Holiarisoa Fanjanirina

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

I am a gift from God to the world. What will I bring into the world that God has sent to  me? Because God loves us unconditionally and without limits. I am convinced that I was called to work in the Blue Cross and this is important to me.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

In 2004, after a training we had in Majunga, a woman (more than 70 years  of age) approached me to congratulate me and to tell me that my presence reminded her of her childhood in the Blue Cross and that, for her, I was the image of Rapaoly Ernest (a very active member of the Blue Cross at that time). She believed greatly in the future of the Blue Cross in Madagascar. Since the training in alcohol policy, our approach has changed.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

To improve the image of the Blue Cross is my objective. My third conference at the International Blue Cross in Nairobi in 2012 where we reflected on the values of the Blue Cross (leadership & spirituality) was my happiest moment during my time working for the Blue Cross. This event had a great effect on me and increased my commitment.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The training on alcohol policy in 2011 with the Norwegian Blue Cross was important for us in Madagascar
(triangle of prevention). Understanding the best approach in order to progress is very important
(evidence.based) but passing this on and ensuring its application in order to be more effective in our work is still a substantial challenge (follow-up activities on alcohol policy).

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

Important projects:

  • Continue to make progress on alcohol policy
  • Complete the construction of our new centre
  • Create income-generating activities : job creation, stable sources of employment for the youth

Schweden

Juli 2018

Q&A with Per-Olof Svensson, General Secretary Blå Bandet

Per-Olof Svensson

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

The best way to avoid alcohol and drug abuse is never to start drinking alcohol or using drugs. Therefore, we inspire young people not to start and adults to think about their alcohol consumption to reduce or stop drinking completely.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes, unless we and our related organizations worked for this, there would be more problems with abuse.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

When I organized a family event with entertainment and related to this, I told the audience about our work. A grandmother came to me afterwards telling me that she thinks what we do is important and she has stopped drinking alcohol since she had grandchildren.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

To get more money to make more information projects. To inspire our local organizations to do more.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

The closest thing is to pay attention to parents thinking about their alcohol consumption, which is often higher during the summer, which may adversely affect the children. We are co- organizing over 40 different seminars on alcohol and drugs for one week at Sweden's largest national political arrangement.

Tansania

Juni 2018

Q&A with Dr. Robert Mlugu, Member of BC Tanzania

Dr. Robert Mlugu

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

Because it helps to change the lives of people affected by drug and alcohol abuse by building awareness. It has changed my life. I used to drink every day. The Blue Cross members taught me how to stop, influencing and transforming my life. My family is shappy with this transformation and I am free. The money used to buy bottles of beer is now used to buy food and other essentials for my family and to send my children to school.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes I am convinced of the impact of my work. Awareness-building programmes have improved the lives of those people affected. The work and influence of the Blue Cross is very important. I was nothing to my family, I didn't support them and I would beat my children when I returned home from the local bar.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

When I was introduced to the Blue Cross Tanzania prevention programme, their objectives and values, I learnt about the effects of alcohol on my health. The programme influences young people in their attitude and behaviour towards drugs and how drugs and alcohol can ruin their lives.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

For me Blue Cross Tanzania is an organization which educates and transforms people's lives. However, due to a lack of funds, the BC cannot expand and open more centres. This is a big challenge.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

The most important programme in my country is the prevention programme because it tackles issues to improve people's lives and the life of the community.

Rumänien

Mai 2018

Q&A with Holger Lux, manager of Rehabilitation Center "House Nazareth"

Holger Lux

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

First of all because I know from my parents’ house what alcohol addiction means. But now my family is glad that for nearly 30 years my father - a medical doctor - has overcome his addiction. But also because I live and work as a medical doctor and psychotherapist in Romania - a country ranked by the WHO among the first ten in the world for alcohol consumption. Our society has to pay a high prize for that.
I learnt at the beginning of my work for Blue Cross from my old friend Klaus Richter, the actual president of Blue Cross Germany, that to work in addiction care means "to accept a man just as he comes, to help him to get again on his feet, to accompany him for a while and then to let him go, to continue his way on his own."

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes, the work of Blue Cross Romania, started in 1990 immediately after the fall of the communist regime, definitely makes a difference in our country. Blue Cross Romania opened the first two treatment centers for recovery from addiction in our country - "House Nazareth" for men and "Island Of Hope" for women. Meanwhile over 2.500 people got the chance to change their lives in our therapeutic communities. And also our message reaches an important part of our society.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

There were many happy moments during the last 20 years. Maybe the happiest was in July 2013 at the opening of the new house of our treatment center for men, built with strong support from IBC. Ronald Hansen, a leader from Blue Cross Norway, who wrote the story "The Potters House" as an inspiration for the diaconal work of the Blue Cross was present at the event and said that his vision had become true in Romania.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

The biggest challenge is that the needs for addiction care in our country are very huge - we estimate over 1 million alcohol addicts for a population of 20 million - but the resources we have are very small. The support of the state is more symbolic. Blue Cross Romania is one of the few NGOs working in this field. The challenge is that we have to constantly find and secure the resources we need to continue our work.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

Let me put it in the words of Geir Gunderson, past president of IBC: "My deepest concern is to increase quality in all aspects of Blue Cross work (worldwide): professional, human resources, finances - and spiritual!! We need to prevent a fragmented reality and further the holistic one.”

Südafrika

April 2018

Q&A with Mrs. Doris V Hlaise, Deputy General Secretary

Mrs. Doris V Hlaise

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

It is important to me because we are helping people who are suffering from drugs and substance abuse. Moreover, we concentrate on the youth because they are tomorrow's nation.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

Yes, it has an impact. In 2015 we adopted a child who had left school for 2 years while he was in grade 11. Now the boy is in university thanks to the Blue Cross. We visited his family over time, and eventually we won him.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

My happiest moment is to see that there are boys and girls who are listening to us. We succeeded in saving one girl and one boy. The girl was 13 years old and she abandoned by her parents. We went there and managed to win this child, she is now in grade 11.

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

Our biggest challenge is the parents who also drink or do drugs. So it is so difficult to win the children because they see their parents doing the same thing that we are fighting against.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

The most important thing that we have to do is to educate our people to understand that drugs are not good for their health and the health of their children. It is what we are trying to do. Through the help of our Almighty God, I have no doubt we will win.

Schweiz

März 2018

Q&A with Sara Gerber, National Coordinator Roundabout

Sara Gerber

1. Why is the Blue Cross work important to you?

It is rewarding to work for an organisation, which responds to the real challenges of our society.

2. Are you convinced of the impact of your work - if so, which aspects?

As the national coordinator I’m relatively removed from the girls  and young women in the roundabout groups. But when I meet them and see in their eyes what roundabout means to them, I am more convinced than ever of the service provided. Roundabout is a street-dance network for girls and young women between 8 and 20 years old. The dancers discover their passion for dance and movement, their self- esteem is reinforced and integration into the group is encouraged.

3. What was your happiest moment during your time with Blue Cross?

I enjoy the passion and the commitment of the cantonal roundabout leaders to their work. I don’t take the opportunity to work with such a dynamic team for granted. I’m happy that we help 1000 girls in Switzerland to be physically active and through this they can be part of a group. I’m also delighted to see how many young women volunteer to become group leaders every week. It’s simply fantastic and a reason to be happy every day!

4. What is/was your biggest challenge in your work for Blue Cross?

As the national coordinator, I’m faced with many different needs and opinions. Finding common ground is not always easy. I would prefer if resource procurement/raising funds/financing were not such a big issue.

5. Blue Cross in your country: What do you consider as your most important project?

Through Blue Cross, I meet all kinds of people of all ages and backgrounds. I find this so interesting! For each individual the most important project is the one that removes him from the situation he is in and gives him stability and a way forward. So it’s difficult for me to say. Looking at the greater picture, I’m glad that Blue Cross is an important and recognised organisation for addiction in Switzerland with much to offer the community. I hope that we can continue to build on this in the future.